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We return for our third segment in the cord-cutter series, this time focusing on how to watch TV without a cable or satellite service. Previously we have looked at Media Center and its alternatives and media servers. This time around we will focus on the actual TV and movie sources available.

All of you likely know the big names in this market, and I will briefly touch on each of those, but there are less well known sources that can be indispensable in this effort. Those we will cover as well. There are so many sources, in fact, that it would be impossible to get them all, but I will hit the ones I have found most useful and rely on you to add others in the comments.

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Some information is best kept secret. Now that we’re living in the future, much of that information is stored in computers. One of the ways to keep things secret in a computer is to use cryptography. Kruptos is one way to use cryptography to keep your data safe.

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Today, the hacking and slashing, blood-drenched world of the medieval era has been rather neglected in the realm of video games. The only real nods to the old era of swords, castles and measly peasants have been in the form of heavily-adjusted fantastical interpretations as opposed to true-to-the-core historical setting. Not to say that this is not entirely unjustified – whilst modern shooters have the advantage of being ‘true-to-life’ in the sense that the fundamental principle behind the firearm is point-and-shoot, trying to convey the true skill and physical aptitude behind deft swordplay is a very tricky matter indeed.

Despite this obstacle, two developers have leapt forward to have a swing at this challenge: Fatshark Studios have lunged forward with the big and ambitious Wars of the Roses, whilst Torn Banner Studios have brandished a fully stand-alone adaptation of their original Half-Life 2 mod with Chivalry: Medieval Warfare. So, does this duo carve out a bold new stake in the FPS-dominated market, or will they be forever condemned to the dungeons of insignificance? Read on to find out.

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Windows Explorer is a – mostly – functional, if slightly, dull way of viewing the data you have stored on your hard drive. If you are looking for a particular file or folder, Explorer is a practical, non-nonsense tool that lets you get the job done.

But if you yearn for something more attractive, if you’re looking for something a little out of the ordinary, if beauty is what you crave from your utilities, Spyglass is the sort of tool for you.

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Depending on your mood and the type of music you want to listen to, you might turn to one of many sources for audio entertainment. You’ve probably got a decent music collection stored on your hard drive, and you could use iTunes to listen to this.

But what about new music, or tracks that you don’t already own? There are a number of online music services available – such as Spotify, Rdio and Last.fm – so you may find that you’re constantly switching between apps and web sites. This could all come to an end when you start using Tomahawk.

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Cutting the cord. It has become a catch-phrase these days for many people. It refers to turning off your cable or satellite TV service in favor of getting your television on the computer or on other hardware. Of course, that works best for those of us who hook an HTPC (home theater PC) to our entertainment center with video going to the big screen TV and audio being pumped through an audio-video receiver and out to a 5.1 or 7.1 speaker system.

There are a lot of directions for cord cutters to go and I am planning to cover a number of them over the coming days and weeks. For now though, we are starting out with one simple TV app — ChrisTV Online, which allows customers to access a number of channels from countries all around the world.

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How many file synchronization services exist these days? If you find that you are working with more than one computer on a frequent basis using a service such as Google Docs or Dropbox saves you the hassle of having to manually transfer the documents you need as it can all be taken care of for you.

The problem with the vast majority of tools that can be used to synchronize files is that they are based on cloud storage and there are limits on the amount of space you have available to you free of charge. This is not the case with Syncbox which enables you set up one computer as a server which will then push file to your connected devices

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The availability of 64-bit systems to the regular user is fairly recent, even though they started to be developed in the 60’s, based on UNIX architecture. Microsoft released their first 64-bit operative system with Windows XP in 2001, but the true landmark came with Windows Vista. Not only was the OS itself more 64-bit oriented, but computers were also sold with improved components, more oriented to run 64-bit software. Windows 7 also boosted the usage of this computer architecture.

When I got through all the advantages of having a 64-bit operating system, I tried to improve the piece of software I use the most on my PC: my web browser. I’ve been a Firefox lover since my first contact with it, so it was a bit disappointing when I found there is not any 64-bit release of it. However, I found the (almost) perfect solution: Pale Moon, a Firefox clone which offers an improved and optimized version oriented for 64-bit systems.

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One of the greatest features presented by Windows 7 (and maintained in Windows 8) is the way the taskbar has been improved upon. Until 7, the main section of the taskbar was divided in two parts: the “quick-launch bar” and the “open programs bar”, but with Windows 7 they were merged in a way that allows the user to lock some programs in the taskbar and to have the opened programs by their side. The ability to lock programs in the taskbar is called “pinning”.

While this really is a great innovation, it has also an important flaw: it does not allow the pinning of folders directly as it happens with programs. If a user tries to pin a folder, Windows will pin the Windows Explorer instance, instead of that specific folder. To solve this, a few independent apps were released, approaching this problem in different fashions. Today I’ll bring you TaskbarPinner, a small, portable and good-looking application which has proved to be an important ally to pin almost anything you want.

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A few hundred apps are released everyday in the Windows Marketplace. The problem is that there are only a few apps that may interest you and would want to install in your Windows Phone. How would you know which one is good or which app is absolutely useful and entertaining without scouring through hundreds of app reviews? This is where Apptastic comes in along.

Appatstic is an app discovery app which sorts out the wheat from the chaff. It doesn’t do only that. There is more to it. So, let us find out about the other features.

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