Manage Your Dual Monitor Setup With MultiMonitorTool

Adding a second monitor to your computer is one of the best things you can do to help increase productivity, make games more enjoyable and make it easier to work with multiple programs at the same time. While Windows gives you some control over the displays you have connected, MultiMonitorTool gives you more options and could help make your dual display setup even more productive.

Available free of charge, this simple utility does not even need to be installed – just unzip and run. It is important to note from the offset that this is a tool that is designed to work with a desktop that has been extended across two monitor; if you are set up in desktop duplication mode, there is no point in using MultiMonitorTool.

While MultiMonitorTool gives you a number of extra options, it will not completely replace the Display Control Panel. You’ll still need to use Windows’ built in options to control the basics such as screen resolution and positioning.

The Control Panel is not replaced by MultiMonitorTool and you will still need it to control many settings

The Control Panel is not replaced by MultiMonitorTool and you will still need it to control many settings

Getting Started

When you first launch the program, you’ll see that the interface is divided into two panes. The upper portion lists the monitors you have connected to your computer, while the lower one lists all of the open programs and windows that you have on the currently selected monitor. For each of the entries in the list, you can see a range of details ranging from the title, to the window size, positioning and the name of the related process.

Discover pretty much everything you need to know about open windows and programs

Discover pretty much everything you need to know about open windows and programs

One of the primary uses of MultiMonitorTool is to make it easier to move apps from one display to another. Rather than having to weed out windows manually and drag them between screen, you can quickly move one or more windows by right clicking in the lower pane of the program and selecting the option to move the selection to either the next monitor or the primary one. This ‘next’ option highlights the fact that while most people will be using the program with just two monitors, it can be used in conjunction with more.

Move programs between monitors with a couple of clicks or a keyboard shortcut

Move programs between monitors with a couple of clicks or a keyboard shortcut

Right click options are also available in the upper pane. You can right click on a monitor and use the context menu that appears to enable or disable the display, or set the currently selected one as the primary display.

Right click on a monitor to quickly disable a screen or change your primary display

Right click on a monitor to quickly disable a screen or change your primary display

 

Monitor Configurations

One of the most useful features of MultiMonitorTool is the ability to save and load monitor profiles. There may be scenarios in which you need to change the resolution of one or more of your monitors, or you may want to disable all but your primary monitor when you are doing certain things. While you will have to use the Control Panel to make any changes you need the first time around, once the new settings are in place you can save them as a new configuration that can be loaded again in a couple of clicks of the mouse.

With monitor configuration created you can switch between them form the system tray

With monitor configuration created you can switch between them form the system tray

While it could be argued that the main function of MultiMonitorTool is to make it easier to move windows between screens and to change monitor settings, the information it provides about open windows can also be useful. That said, you may feel overwhelmed by the amount of detail you are given so you may want to hide some of the data columns that you are not interested in.

You can opt to hide some columns if you don’t need to see so much information

You can opt to hide some columns if you don’t need to see so much information

In addition to the lower panes columns, which may well mean that you need to scroll from side to side to see all information, you can also opt to view details about a particular program window in a popup – just double click an item in the list or right click and select Properties.

MultiMonitorTool can provide you with app information in a pop up window

MultiMonitorTool can provide you with app information in a pop up window

Wrapping Up

All of the options available in the app can be accessed in a variety of ways, and for many task you may well find that the standard toolbar is as easy a method as any. One final feature that’s worth mentioning is the preview window. This pop-out window displays a preview of the currently selected monitor, but this is purely for informational purposes as it is not possible to interact with the preview. It would have been nice to be able to bring windows into the foreground by clicking them in the preview, but sadly this option is not available.

The preview window gives you a neat overview of what is happening on each of your monitors

The preview window gives you a neat overview of what is happening on each of your monitors

There are a wealth of keyboard shortcuts that make it very quick and easy to move programs around your monitors and perform other tasks, and if you’re a fan of the Command Line there are a range of parameters that you can use when launching the program in this way – this is a great option if you want to avoid using the GUI for any reason and also gives you the change to integrate the features of MultiMonitorTool into macros and batch files.

The program is available in both 32- and 64-bit varieties and can be used with any version of Windows from XP all the way up to 8 – you can grab your free copy from the program web site.


Summary

An intriguing tool to supplement Windows’ Control Panel that gives you a useful selection of options to help you make the most of your available screens.

7.5
  • http://daniel-lucas.com Daniel Lucas

    Looks like a nice piece of software. For the last year or so I’ve been using Display Fusion, it lets you do loads of stuff with your screens.

  • http://windows.appstorm.net/author/markwilson/ Mark Wilson

    Display Fusion is a great tool tool. I’ve used it in the past and would recommend it for anyone not looking for a free tool- the free version is a bit too limited really, I think

    • http://daniel-lucas.com Daniel Lucas

      I agree, the free version doesn’t offer much. The paid version is worth every penny though.

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