Keep Your Files Organized with QuickMove

If you keep your hard drive in any sort of order, it’s likely that when you download files, you have a number of folders that you use on a regular basis. Photos may end up getting moved to one folder while video get moved to another.

QuickMove is a free tool that can be used to automate this process. The program can be used to create rules that will be used to automatically move files to particular folder based on their file type.

 

The process itself is not entirely automated, so you don’t need to worry that all of your JPEG images will suddenly move to a new folder without you having to do anything. QuickMove adds a new entry to the context menu that appears when you right click on a file and this is used to move files to folders based on the rules you have configured.

Getting Up and Running

You can download a free copy of QuickMove from the program web site. At the site, scroll down the page and click to expand the Download section before clicking the CodeLine link. You will then need to extract the compressed zip file so you can access the setup file to start the installation.

The QuickMove web site may not look like much, but the app is very handy

The QuickMove web site may not look like much, but the app is very handy

Run through the installation in the usual way – the only thing you need to do is to ensure that you have Microsoft .NET Framework 4 installed – and once this has been done, just select the option to launch the program.

If you don't already have it, you'll need to download a copy of Microsoft .NET Framework 4

If you don't already have it, you'll need to download a copy of Microsoft .NET Framework 4

The first time you start the app you’ll be invited to upgrade to QuickMove Pro, but you can continue to use it without having to pay by clicking the No thanks. Continue with Free Version button.

At this stage, you should find that there is no need to change any settings, but it is worth clicking Settings to the left of the program window and making sure that the Run at Startup and As Simple Menu Item options are selected.

QuickMove can be added to the root of the context menu or to a sub-menu

QuickMove can be added to the root of the context menu or to a sub-menu

Creating Rules

You can create rules in advance by launching the main program interface – just double click the icon in the notification area of the system tray – but it is actually easier to create them as and when they are needed. This means that you do not need to plan ahead too much and can just create rules as and when they are needed.

To create your first rule, right click on a file – we’ve chosen to use a JPEG image – and select the QuickMove option from the context menu. A pop up window will appear indicating that no suitable rule has been found to tell QuickMove how to deal with this particular file and gives you the opportunity to create one.

QuickMove appears in the context menu no matter what type of file you click on

QuickMove appears in the context menu no matter what type of file you click on

Start by indicating what files should be controlled by the rule – you can limit it to files that have exactly the same name and extension as the current file you like, but it is more likely that you’ll want to create rules that apply to different file types. If this is the case, select the option labelled Exactly matching the extension and then move down the list of options.

It may be the case that you do not necessarily want to deal with all of your JPEG images in exactly the same way. You may way to use QuickMove to move JPEGs from the desktop to one particular folder on your hard drive, while those found on a memory card should be moved to another.

With this in mind, you can make use of the When Found In section to configure more advanced rule options. If you want a rule to apply no matter which folder files start off in, select the Any folder option, but otherwise select This folder.

Rules can be precisely defined to determine how your files will be dealt with

Rules can be precisely defined to determine how your files will be dealt with

You then need to choose how and where files should be moved. If you want the rule to always move the specified files to a particular folder select the Move to option and then click the folder button to choose a location.

If you’d prefer to be able to choose where files should go each time, select the option labelled Show me my list of last used Target Folders to choose from. With all of these settings configured, enter a name for your rule and click OK.

Making Use of QuickMove

So far we’ve looked at what happens in QuickMove if you try to use the application with a file that does not match a rule, but there are a couple of scenarios for files do match. If you have created a rule for JPEG images and then select the QuickMove option from the context menu, the image you have clicked will be moved to your designated folder and a system tray notification will confirm that this has happened – you are even given the chance to reverse the accidental moving of files.

Made a mistake? Reverse a move by clicking the notification popup

Made a mistake? Reverse a move by clicking the notification popup

If you select a file and the rule that applies to it indicate that a list of recent folders should be displayed, you will be prompted to choose from a folder that has already been used by the program – you can also opt to select a completely different folder if you prefer.

QuickMove also enables to you choose a folder for files before each move

QuickMove also enables to you choose a folder for files before each move

Wrapping Up

Whether you are currently a fairly organized person who is looking for a way to make things easier, or you are trying to get your files in order for the first time, QuickMove has you covered.


Summary

Always cutting and pasting the same types of files to the same folders? Always navigating deep folder structures to archive the same types of files? Wish you could just be prompted for a list of your favourite target folders? Wish that you could just “right-click” on a file and see it automatically moved based on rules learnt “on-the-fly”?

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